filmmaking.net Blog Archive

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Anatomy of a Scene: The Building Blocks of a Memorable Movie

By C.J. Perry, posted 2 March 2011

From the outside looking in, a movie is just a collection of scenes that are tied together. So what separates the great films—the ones that are embedded in our collective consciousness—from the forgettable ones? Several things elevate a movie into being memorable: a great concept, a great cast, and ultimately, a great screenplay. As a writer, you have to be able to look at that collection of scenes objectively, to know how to tie it all together, and to turn what seems like a loose collection of scenes into a story.

The filmmaking.net Links Directory is Now Live!

By Benjamin Craig, posted 26 January 2011

Well, it's been slightly longer in the making than we'd hoped, but that's ancient history now. The filmmaking.net Links Directory has launched! Founded in 1994, filmmaking.net is one of the oldest sites for new and independent filmmakers on the web. The Links Directory is currently available as a fully-functional beta and accepting submissions right now.

Trailer Festival 2011 Now Accepting Submissions

By Benjamin Craig, posted 18 January 2011

As a general rule, we don't do coverage of film festival calls for entry as there are just too many festivals out there, but in the case of The Trailer Festival, we're going to make an exception as there is a great filmmaking upside to this event.

Returning to Super 8

By Joel Valle, posted 12 January 2011

It's a common question of amateur filmmakers. "How do I make my video footage look like film?" and also "What camera to buy?" As a low budget amateur filmmaker myself I had even a more pertinent question; "How can I even afford a high end camcorder if I'm broke?"

Building Suspense: How to Keep the Audience on the Edge of Their Seat

By C.J. Perry, posted 9 December 2010

As a screenwriter, the ability to craft dramatic suspense can turn your script from a basic, by the numbers story into something memorable, and the basis of a movie that people will remember. Film is a visceral art, and a thousand things have to go right in the execution of a story to make it resonate, but it all starts with the screenwriter. Without the basic foundation and the proper storytelling tools, your script might not make it past the first read.

Screenwriting: How to Get and Work with an Agent

By C.J. Perry, posted 9 November 2010

As a screenwriter, there are a few ways to get your script sold and -possibly - made into a movie. Screenwriting contests have emerged as a way for unknown writers to get their name out there, but this requires either winning the contest or placing very high, and more than likely having to do it in multiple contests to get noticed. If you have the money and are a director as well as a writer, you can go the indie route, but providing you get the movie made, there is no guarantee of any kind of distribution. The most traditional way for a screenwriter to get his or her work sold and made into a movie is by getting an agent.

Competition - make a part of Stephen Gyllenhaal's next film

By Benjamin Craig, posted 8 November 2010

Here's an unusual twist on the "get a filmmaker to make us a commercial for free" fad that seems to be sweeping the marketing and PR business at the moment: create an infomercial for director Stephen Gyllenhaal's next film!

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